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Monthly Archives: July 2006

Variants in Three Genes Predict Development of Type 2 Diabetes

Common variants in three genes have been found to predict development of type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, based on a recent study.

Healthy Lifestyle Reduces Women’s Stroke Risk

Women who are non-smokers, exercise regularly, have a healthy diet, including moderate alcohol consumption, and otherwise live a healthy lifestyle may have a reduced risk of stroke.

Study Compares Gastric Bypass and Gastric Banding Surgeries

Do patients who undergo gastric bypass procedures have fewer complications, a greater reduction in obesity-related diseases, more weight loss and a higher level of satisfaction than those who have gastric banding procedures?

New Clues To How Major Weight-Loss Drugs Work

Some of the most important weight-loss drugs work by enhancing the effect of the brain chemical serotonin. These include sibutramine and fenfluramine, which was recalled after the combination with dexfenfluramine, called fen-phen, was linked to potentially fatal heart valve abnormalities.

Study Sheds Light On Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes

A growing number of cystic fibrosis patients are battling a second, often deadly complication: a unique form of diabetes that shares characteristics of the type 1 and type 2 versions that strike many Americans.

Discovery May Explain Gender Gap In Disease Risk, Drug Response

Study sheds light on why the same disease often strikes males and females differently, and why the genders may respond differently to the same drug.

Nationwide Recall of Power Packs used in Insulin Pumps

Disetronic Medical Systems Inc. announced a voluntary nationwide recall of the Disetronic D-TRONplus Power Packs, that power the D-TRONplus Insulin Pump.

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise In Treating Alzheimer’s

Treatment of high blood sugar may have a scientific connection to memory loss that could, one day, benefit millions of people with Alzheimer's Disease, which affects up to 4.5 million older Americans, bringing with it impaired thinking and memory.

Type 2 Diabetes Increases the Risk of Glaucoma in Women

A study has shown that Type 2 diabetes is associated with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), the most common form of glaucoma, accounting for about 60 to 70% of all glaucomas.

Obesity Associated With Psychiatric Disorders, Decreased Odds of Substance Abuse

Obesity is associated with a 25 percent increase in the risk of developing mood and anxiety disorders and a 25 percent decrease in likeliness for substance abuse.

Researchers Develop T-Cells From Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time that human embryonic stem cells can be genetically manipulated and coaxed to develop into mature T-cells.

Study: Netrins Hold Potential For Treating Diabetes, Other Diseases

Researchers have taken a potentially powerful new therapy for treating diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and other illnesses out of the test tube and into animals by demonstrating it restores nerve and blood vessel growth.

Discovery: Cancer Biology Discovery Could Lead To New Diabetes Treatments

Researchers have found that the acute loss of a protein called menin can cause the proliferation of pancreatic islet cells, which secrete insulin to regulate blood sugar. Discovery has implications for treating Type 1 diabetes.

Study: Possible Strategy Against Obesity, Diabetes and Infertility

Findings suggest that selectively turning on STAT3 may help prevent diabetes by improving glucose metabolism and help restore fertility as well.

Study: Cystic Fibrosis Patients Battling a Unique Form of Diabetes

A growing number of cystic fibrosis patients are battling a second, often deadly complication: a unique form of diabetes that shares characteristics of the type 1 and type 2 versions that strike many Americans.

Study: Small Towns Share Big-City Obesity Problems

The environmental attributes that promote obesity are generally the same in rural communities as those previously found in urban and suburban areas.

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